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 winter clothing 
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Mountaineer
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Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2013 5:24 am
Posts: 119
Location: Concord NH
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 winter clothing
I know its a bit early but I would like to start working on clothing for winter hikes. I've recently got back into hiking and this summer I hiked exclusively in shorts. I've come to the realization that I am a hot hiker. I tend to stay warm when others around me get chilly. with this in mind I'm trying to put together a clothing system that will work for the late fall and into winter.

What are you folks wearing on you bottom half? I was thinking about something like a water resistant wicking layer with some type of windproof, lightly insulated pants to put on when taking a break or at camp. any suggestions?

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Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:59 pm
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Sovereign Woodsman
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Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:10 pm
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Location: Natick, MA
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I have generally used a pair of mid-weight polypro long underwear pants with standard nylon zip-offs (yup, the same ones many of us wear in the summer). This setup was used on many winter 4k summit trips. My gaiters (which i wear if there is snow) come up just below the knee and take care of the water-proofness issue for the most part. This has worked well for me from mid-to-upper 30s down to -10F, though I didn't stop long on that -10 day, I would have needed to add a layer otherwise. This is a pretty common setup from what I've seen, and means only 1 new piece of clothing (plus an extra layer or two in the pack when it gets cold - in case of an unplanned night out). You'll definitely want a waterproof layer just in case, I carry my rain pants for that use, but haven't needed them yet.

I have a set of EMS-branded softshell pants which I've used a few times too. The days I have used them have been too warm for me to use the long johns underneath (low 20s and up), but would probably work better with those the next time I run into a sub-zero day.

FWIW, I tend to hike warm too. Usually just a baselayer shirt even in the dead of winter, while my hiking partners might be wearing 2-3 layers. Everyone's different.

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Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:15 pm
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Sovereign Woodsman
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Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2012 9:21 am
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Location: Lynn MA
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I also run hot and this set up works for me. If snow is not an issue I forego gaiters. Below 20 degrees at base id tend to wear my Merril Isotherm 8's for boots. Socks are a few pairs of synthetic/wool socks. a sweat wicking base layer with light windproof pants that zip off at the knees for the legs. above 30 degrees I roll these up and zip off the lower half of my pants. light sweat wicking T shirt for going up to a peak. (I still sweat like crazy at 10 degrees) My Jacket is a columbia bugaboo that has a zip off inner fleece liner that ill pull out for pit stops and lounging on the summits. Lounging on the summits may require the outer shell. I carry two pairs of gloves suitable for skiing. One for the trip up and if that pair gets wet ill swap out. headgear. I use a Buff balaclava with a fleece collar. This of course can be adjusted in configuration to suit my current and ever changing needs without the need to stop. (hat, bandana, headband, full balaclava). When needed my synthetic hat can be added (rare).

Fully covered by these have kept me very comfy at 13 degrees with 45 MPH winds 60 mph gusts lounging about above treeline.


Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:18 pm
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I too started out with cycling tights under nylon zip-offs. Most of the time, you will be fine in just that. Sometimes, in March when it's warmer and sunnier, I just wear the nylon zip-offs. I find it comical to see folks in the parking lot in balaclavas, ski masks and goggles, and down jackets. Below treeline, I'm generally wearing only one layer, and often it is a short sleeve with arm warmers which I can remove if I am really warm.

Tim

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Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:45 pm
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Mountaineer
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Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2013 5:24 am
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Location: Concord NH
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Thank for the replies. I've been using a poncho for rain gear/tarp all season. looks like its time to pick up a pair of pants. can anyone recommend a pair will a full length zipper? I had a pair awhile ago that ha mysteriously vanished.

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Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:56 am
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Location: Worcester, MA
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 Re: winter clothing
Dmkerr wrote:
I know its a bit early...


NEVER!

For bottom half:
BASE LAYER: I use Zyflex thermal pants. I find that they keep my skin cool, but not hot. They're great at wicking, and I've used them as a base in -40 temps. http://zyflexsportswear.com/products/thpants.html

OUTER LAYER: I use non-insulated North Face pants, with zips down the sides. I find these are great at keeping water and wind out... plus they vent easily.

I've been in some frigid temps with this setup, and I've never been too cold nor too hot. I use gaiters as well, so this mitigates some of the cold. For shoes, I have 400g insulated Keen Revels.

One thing to note about me is that I don't stop for long. Summer, winter, whatever... I keep moving. My winter setup will keep you warm if you keep moving, but not for very long if you stop for more than 5-10 minutes.

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Tue Sep 10, 2013 7:48 am
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Peak Bagger
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Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 12:44 pm
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Location: Kensington, NH
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I just wear my normal summer zip off pants when below tree line.

I carry an old pair of ski pants with me, but those usually only go on if I break tree line in crazy conditions or if I'm going downhill on a butt sled. :D


Tue Sep 10, 2013 10:01 am
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Adept Ascender
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Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 1:52 pm
Posts: 526
Location: Worcester
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below tree line winter hikes

mid weight wool lower base layer with nylon hiking pants

mid weight wool upper base layer with softshell (plus mid weight wool pullover sweater if significantly below zero)

windproof fleece jacket gets added if I am stopped for long duration

- I find exposing my head and wrists, opening up the 1/4 chest zippers, and reducing my rate of travel are effective ways to limit heat build up and the subsequent need to stop and shed a later

- I dislike softshells with thermal liners; I would rather have the ability to shed that layer

- I found LL Bean wool guide pants to be too warm for hiking; think they are better suited for hunters, etc.

- for overnights [intentional or not], I have fleece bibbed pants with full side zips that I got from an army navy store, also got my sock liners and winter socks from the army navy store, lots of inexpensive winter clothing at army navy stores

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Tue Sep 10, 2013 1:07 pm
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Adept Ascender
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examples

http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=12510389

http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?pr ... 9.12195004

http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=12510388

http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?pr ... 6.10794030

http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?pr ... 38.3690276

http://go-armynavy.com/military-surplus ... -bibs.html

http://go-armynavy.com/military-surplus ... iners.html

http://go-armynavy.com/military-surplus ... socks.html

http://go-armynavy.com/military-surplus ... liner.html

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Tue Sep 10, 2013 1:31 pm
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Flatfoot
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Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:12 am
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Location: USA
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 winter clothing
Yes, Winter is coming so I am ready to wear hoodies and jackets.. I have some brand hoodies which I purchased online and I have plan to buy some more warm pullover hoodies or Jackets this time.. I found Jerzees brand pics and feel that it would be good choice to for this winter season.


Last edited by parkerjames224 on Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:48 am, edited 2 times in total.



Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:23 am
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Hiking Forums Are My Crack
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Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:37 pm
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Location: Exeter, NH
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Midweight synthetic base layer and the lightly insulated North Face pants with side zips. I find side zips/pit zips etc to be a fantastic feature for winter hiking gear. The more the beter.


Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:34 pm
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Flatfoot
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Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:04 am
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i love winter season as compare to summer...


Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:19 am
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Flatfoot
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Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2017 4:22 am
Posts: 1
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 Re: winter clothing
I picked up the thermal tops from CalibreApparel athletic pant (brown & a black one), and I've also worn them as an outer top with a pretty scarf & blue pants to go out to eat in the evenings.


Thu Mar 09, 2017 4:38 am
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Flatfoot
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2017 8:26 pm
Posts: 3
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 Re: winter clothing
The recommended approach for winter dressing is to add clothing layers when you get cold and take off layers when you start to sweat. Sweating should be avoided in winter because wet or damp clothing will chill you when you stop moving. Take off layers if you start to sweat or slow down your pace to generate less body heat.

https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice ... asics.html


Tue Nov 21, 2017 8:36 pm
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