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 Mt W-i-lley or W-I-lley 

W-i-lley or W-I-lley?
W-i-lley  79%  [ 11 ]
W-I-lley  21%  [ 3 ]
Total votes : 14

 Mt W-i-lley or W-I-lley 
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Sovereign Woodsman
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 Mt W-i-lley or W-I-lley
How do the rest of you pronounce this mountain and what is the correct way?


Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:33 pm
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Sovereign Woodsman
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Willie.

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Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:46 pm
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I agree with Woods Dweller...at least, that's the way I say it. I don't know what the correct way is.

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Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:49 pm
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Years ago, I watched a documentary called "New Hampshire's
White Mountains and Clear Lakes." In the documentary,
the narrator made mention of the Willey House in Crawford
Notch and he had pronounced it "Willy," so ever since then,
that's the way I've been pronouncing it.

I don't think it's called the "Wile E. Range." :lol:

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Sun Feb 20, 2011 7:08 pm
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 Re: Mt W-i-lley or W-I-lley
IQuest wrote:
How do the rest of you pronounce this mountain and what is the correct way?


Both.

Brian


Sun Feb 20, 2011 7:14 pm
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Will-E. Otherwise, according to our convoluted rules of grammar and phonetics here in the English speaking world, it would be spelled "Wiley." One consonant, long preceeding vowel sound. Two consonants, short preceeding vowel sound.

Class dismissed. :)

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Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:15 pm
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Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:29 pm
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Kathy wrote:
... according to our convoluted rules of grammar and phonetics here in the English speaking world, it would be spelled ....


I dunno, Kathy, I don't have much faith in rules when it comes to English ...
how do you spell "fish" ?
ghoti ...

Who was it, Gallagher I think , had a good sketch on English spellings....
d-a-u-g-h-t-e-r ..."dotter"
l-a-u-g-h-t-e-r ... "lotter?" n-o-o-o ... "laffter" ....

stupid language. They don't *have* spelling bees for Spanish ....

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Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:38 pm
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FWIW it is the coyote version, not Nelsons first name, if I read this correctly, which is what I have always heard to be the correct way, although I myself can't help but call it "Willie" like Nelson half the time I speak of it.

...Origins of the Surnames Wylie, Wyllie, Wily, and Wiley, etc. (Soundex W400).

wi-ly () adj : marked by skill in deception; "a foxy scheme"; "sly as a fox".
From wi-le () .] A trick or stratagem practiced for insnaring or deception; a sly, insidious; artifice; a beguilement; an allurement.
[Middle English wil, from Old North French, from Old Norse vl, trick, or of Low German origin.]

There are many ways to spell the surnames prononced as the words wi-le and wi-ly above but, no matter how it's spelled, there can be little doubt as to the origin of the name. The word comes to us from Old Norse spoken in Britton and Scotland in the 9th and 10th centuries A.D. and was used to describe the little red dog-like animal known today as the fox. In the 10th and 11th centuries the word is found in Middle English and again used to describe the fox. In the 13th century the word "wile" or "wyle" means "crafty or sly, like a fox". There is no doubt that the word meant a fox or to be like a fox.

The first time it appears as a surname is in 1355 Scotland when Donald Wyle of Dalswinton registered his lands in Nithsdale, on the River Nith. Dalswinton was a town in the area and lies between the present day towns of Thornhill and Dumfries in Dumfrieshire in the Galloway District of the Southern Uplands of Scotland.

On August 4, 1376 the same Donald was granted Ensigns Amorial at Dumfries Abbey as "DONALD OF DALSWINTON - WYLIE OF THAT ILK". The principle charge of Donald's Arms was a fox and all Arms granted since to Wylies in Scotland have born either a walking or running fox.

Over the next few years Wylies of various spellings, presumeably descendants of Donald, appear all over Scotland and Northern England. Thomas Wyly is listed in the 1379 Yorkshire Poll Tax, John Wili is in Montrose in 1434, William Wyly appears in Ayrshire a few years later and Richard Wyly was Vicar of St. Mary's Dundee in the 1450's. The Wylies spread throughout England and Ireland for the next 200 years and then began their incredible journey to the new worlds.

Many of the Wylies in England used the spelling Wyllie and Wyley, while the Irish Wylies prefered Wiley. It is important to note that names were spelled differently every time a marriage, will or deed was recorded. Sometimes the famiies changed their names just to "fit in". Some Wylies changed their spellings to Wiley and some Wileys changed to Wylie after immigrating to America. I've found branches of my own family using Wily, Wiley, Willey and Wylie between 1788 and 1920.


Sun Feb 20, 2011 10:24 pm
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scooter wrote:
Kathy wrote:
... according to our convoluted rules of grammar and phonetics here in the English speaking world, it would be spelled ....


I dunno, Kathy, I don't have much faith in rules when it comes to English ...
how do you spell "fish" ?
ghoti ...

Who was it, Gallagher I think , had a good sketch on English spellings....
d-a-u-g-h-t-e-r ..."dotter"
l-a-u-g-h-t-e-r ... "lotter?" n-o-o-o ... "laffter" ....

stupid language. They don't *have* spelling bees for Spanish ....


I know I know Scooter. And I think it was George Bernard Shaw w/the fish/ghoti idea. Yet, there are some rules that do have more of a universal use and the pronounciation with the long and short vowel sounds coupled with the single or double consonents is fairly solid. I'm sure someone can come up w/something that is an exception to this rule. However, in the interest of the complexities of the language:

An Ode to English Plurals

We'll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes,
But the plural of ox becomes oxen, not oxes.
One fowl is a goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of moose should never be meese.
You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of mice,
Yet the plural of house is houses, not hice.

If the plural of man is always called men,
Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen?
If I speak of my foot and show you my feet,
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?
If one is a tooth and a whole set are teeth,
Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth?

Then one may be that, and three would be those,
Yet hat in the plural would never be hose,
And the plural of cat is cats, not cose.
We speak of a brother and also of brethren,
But though we say mother, we never say methren.
Then the masculine pronouns are he, his and him,
But imagine the feminine: she, shis and shim!

Let's face it - English is a crazy language.
There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger;
neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
English muffins weren't invented in England .
We take English for granted, but if we explore its paradoxes,
we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square,
and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing,
grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham?
Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend.
If you have a bunch of odds and ends and
get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught?
If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?
Sometimes I think all the folks who grew up speaking English
should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane.

In what other language do people recite at a play and play at a recital?
We ship by truck but send cargo by ship.
We have noses that run and feet that smell.
We park in a driveway and drive in a parkway.
And how can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?

You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out, and
in which an alarm goes off by going on.

And in closing, if Father is Pop, how come Mother's not Mop

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Mon Feb 21, 2011 11:02 pm
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Thanks for sharing that Kathy, that's great!


Tue Feb 22, 2011 3:14 pm
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Kathy wrote:
Will-E. Otherwise, according to our convoluted rules of grammar and phonetics here in the English speaking world, it would be spelled "Wiley." One consonant, long preceeding vowel sound. Two consonants, short preceeding vowel sound.

Class dismissed. :)

I'm with you. Was going to mention the same rules!

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Fri Feb 25, 2011 3:34 pm
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Since people seem so keen on this (I personally still contend say it however you want, what are we pronunciation Nazi's? :lol: ....and trust me, there are a few of us old timers on this forum who remember one guy who was a MASSIVE pronunciation Nazi :roll: ) I guess I should mention that in one of Fritz Wetherbee's books he tells the story of the Willey family. He also goes on to say that the tragedy is what gave rise to the phrase "it gives me the willies." So unless you say "it gives me the why-lees" I guess your saying the mountains name wrong. :wink:

But, again, I say pronunce it however you feel. 8)

Brian


Fri Feb 25, 2011 6:28 pm
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I say pronounce it however you like, people will know what you mean either way but it is a proper name so there is a correct way to say it. I don't live in New H"ay"mpshire just because someone feels like saying it that way.

What the actual correct way is I don't know, although if what I posted above is correct it's like "Whylee" and I don't believe the rules of the English language apply to it if it's French, German or Norse in origin as it says.

Again, I don't have a definitive answer, probably isn't one unless there's some decendants around who know for sure how Sam pronounced his last name.


Fri Feb 25, 2011 10:03 pm
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Thanks for all of the responses. I will continue to say it the way I always have and now know that it could go either way.

Here's another one: What is the proper way to pronounce Guyot?


Fri Feb 25, 2011 10:17 pm
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