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 So if I want to climb all 48... 
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Flatfoot
Flatfoot

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 5:18 pm
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Location: Philadelphia, PA
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 So if I want to climb all 48...
...but I live in PA, and only visit NH in the summer...do I have a chance?

Where should I start?

Can someone find me a job in NH, as well as a great place to live, a car, and perhaps a new boyfriend who is the same as the old one only willing to move to NH?

Thanks. Real advice wanted: where should I start?


Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:47 am
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Sovereign Woodsman
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 Re: So if I want to climb all 48...
Peachacid wrote:
...but I live in PA, and only visit NH in the summer...do I have a chance?

Where should I start?

Can someone find me a job in NH, as well as a great place to live, a car, and perhaps a new boyfriend who is the same as the old one only willing to move to NH?

Thanks. Real advice wanted: where should I start?


Well it all depends. How is your hiking history? Are you here the whole summer or brief periods of time?
If you do them over a period of time, sure it's possible. As to where to start, it still depends on what you have done in the past. Either start easy (Hale, Cannon) or a bit harder (Franconcia Ridge: Lincoln, Lafayette).

Greg


Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:53 am
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Sovereign Woodsman
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haha, well I can't help you with everything, but I can say that it's entirely possible. I guess it depends on how fast you're looking to finish. Some people do the 48 in 10 days, some people do them in 40 years....so you have some flexibility there ;) The good thing about the mountains up here is that a lot of them can be strung together so you can bag two or three peaks in a day without having to hike more than 13 miles or so. So depending on weather, if you're in good shape and ready to go if you arrive for a two week vaca and hike a number of days you can make a good dent.

I guess my advice would be to train however you can - whether it's getting out on the trails in PA or if that's not possible going to the gym and walking/running on an incline. The best practice for hiking though is more hiking so I would say to get out and do whatever you can.

When you're getting closer to coming on vaca, I would recommend buying a guidebook and doing some research online about which mountains/trails you want to try. Then you'll just be that much more prepared to hit the ground running.

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Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:58 am
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I'll echo what Kelly said: yes, it's do-able, depending on your timeframe. Whether 10 days, 10 months, 10 seasons, 10 summers or more, the mountains will be there.

Good suggestion of hers to pick out a few and plan to start w/those. The problem you might run into is weather. What we do is have a plan A and B, sometimes C.

Plan A is our ideal scenario: both of us are feeling great, things (boots, muscles, etc.) are working well and the weather is stellar so that higher summits are an option, as are ridge walks to tackle more than one peak.

Plan B is generally a truncated version of Plan A. Plan C allows for crappy weather and is usually a sheltered trail w/o much exposure.

That being said and addressing your question of where to start, that too depends on your level of fitness and comfort. I'd suggest starting w/a few of the lower peaks, or loops to get the most bang for your buck and see how you fare. I'd suggest hancocks or tom/field/willey or pierce/jackson or pierce/eisenhower or liberty/flume or liberty/lafayette or kinsmans. This site is awesome for current conditions, trail reports: http://trailsnh.com/NH-4000.php

Good luck. Ask questions. Be positive. Go for it! I started on my quest (though at the time, I didn't realize I was on a quest) in the 1970s, and have quite recently picked up the challenge again after a 25 year hiatus. Keep at it, chip away, enjoy the journey and you'll get there.

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Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:50 am
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Hiking Forums Are My Crack
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Location: Exeter, NH
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Also if you are into backpacking instead of day hiking you can do it much faster by using either car spots or the AMC shuttle. A week to ten day long backpacking trip, provided the weather is good and your in good hiking shape, could take you the entire NH section of the AT from Moose to Moriah and bag Mooseilauke, Kinsmans, Flume, Liberty, Lafayette, Lincoln, Garfield, Galehead, The Twins, The Bonds (with a slight detour), Zealand, Tom, Field, Willey, Jackson, Pierce, Ike, Monroe, Washington, Jefferson, Adams, Madison, the Wildcats, The 3 Carters and Moriah. Maybe I missed one or two, that was off the top of my head, but that's 32 of them right there with only a few minor side tracks. You could always break that down into multiple smaller trips too if a week to ten days in the woods isn't your idea of a vacation.

If backpacking isn't your thing there's always the huts, which closely follow that route. Either option will probably get them done significantly faster than dayhiking them.


Tue Jun 29, 2010 3:12 pm
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Adept Ascender
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I'd say, if you time in NH is to be limited, go big. I'd start with Moosilauke either by the Benton Trail, or Glencliff. Then either the Franconia Ridge or Southern Presidentials. Then Northern Presidentials, and do the Twins/Bonds all at once. Yeah there are a lot of other nice ones, but who knows what the future will bring, and when and if you might return to NH. In your case I would not save the best for last.


Tue Jun 29, 2010 3:26 pm
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Peak Bagger
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Kathy wrote:
Good suggestion of hers to pick out a few and plan to start w/those. The problem you might run into is weather. What we do is have a plan A and B, sometimes C.


This is a great suggestion. Considering that you are going to be making a long trip just to get up here, you want to make sure that you have hiking options. Most everyone here on the forum knows that you can't just say "Saturday I am going to hike Mt Washington", because there are days in July and August that you would need to prepare for near winter hiking conditions or have near zero visibility. Options are a must IMHO when it comes to hiking the whites.

Just enjoy the adventure and you will pick them off one by one.

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4k: 48/48
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Tue Jun 29, 2010 7:51 pm
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Mountaineer
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Location: Wilton, CT
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I'm a bit closer than you, southern CT, and plan on doing all 48. It's about a 4.5-5 hour trip each way for me. I started 10 years ago and have done 29 so far. You have to just commit to at least one trip a year, and plan on knocking off 2-5 each trip. Yes, there have been years where I have only done one because of weather or other issues, but I make sure I plan as best I can. When I started I figured about 15 years, so roughly on track. Just start studying the mountains, trails, and go hike!


Wed Jun 30, 2010 11:18 am
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I've decided I'm hiking all 48 before my 30th birthday 7-28-2012. I've got 4 notches on my belt so far, but I've had an aggressive summer and barring any major injuries, a few winter hikes, and a little luck, I've got this.

I've got 10 peaks in 4 weeks planned for August. Eisenhower/Pierce this weekend, Hancock Notch 8/14, NKinsman & Cannon 8/21, then an overnight hike 8/28 & 29. Wanted to do the Tripyramids, Whiteface & Passaconaway with a nap saturday night on kate sleeper. If all goes well I'll be relaxing on the Saco river for laborday and have 34 left. Good start me thinks...

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Thu Aug 05, 2010 8:53 pm
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You'll make that date easy I'd think. I started slow but did all but my last one, which was 27, for my anytime time list in one summer/fall. I also did 26 for the winter list last winter. Sounds like you have the ability to finish well before your target date.

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Fri Aug 06, 2010 4:18 am
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Peak Bagger
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You can do it. I grew up in New England and moved to Indiana after college. I was about halfway through the 48 when I moved away, but am almost finished as I get back a fair amount...

The key for me is staying in hiking shape, I do a lot of hiking (long days to get the vertical) in the very hilly regions of Northern Michigan. I am sure you can do the same in PA.

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53 / 67 NE4K
58 / 100 NEHH
12 / 52 WAV
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Fri Aug 06, 2010 7:07 am
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I started hiking at the age of 42 back in '97 after someone gave me a gift certificate to Barnes and Noble for my birthday and for some inexplicable reason I purchased the AMC guide book. Less than two years later I completed the 4,000 footers and felt like I was in the best shape of my life. After so many years of physical inactivity, smoking and drinking and whatnot, I was amazed at how the human body can recover; it's the only machine that gets stronger the more you use it. Bottom line, if I could do it, anyone can.
As far as you living out of state goes, I've met a number of people who would come up for a week or two each summer and knock off just a few to a dozen or more. Particularly, this guy from the D.C. area, on Owl's Head, 9/9/98 and ironically again on my final 4k on Mt. Cabot, 8/9/99. How weird is that!
As other folks on this thread have stated, arm youself with as much knowledge as you can, prepare to be flexible with your plans, and enjoy yourself, savor it; there's no rush, the mountains will be waiting for you.

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Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:55 pm
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Peak Bagger
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The other thing to remember is that it is not a race. In humble my opinion some folks do them too fast to take it all in. Of course, to each his or her own. Enjoy!

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48 / 48 NH4K
53 / 67 NE4K
58 / 100 NEHH
12 / 52 WAV
153 / 875 NCT


Fri Aug 06, 2010 2:20 pm
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